Halloween is one of my favorite holidays. It’s filled with excitement, creativity, and chocolate. Who could ask for anything more? Do you know what was more terrifying than binging on scary movies and gaining 10 lbs from overindulgence: An ER Trip to the Vet!

We all thought the Halloween candy was safe, high up on the kitchen table. Nope. “Tucker” had even less restraint than I did. He jumped up on the table and ate every last bite – wrappers and all! Radiographs, induced vomiting, IV fluids, activated charcoal and monitoring were needed to treat him that night.

Please follow these tips to prevent a similar fate and any other Halloween pet hazards, so only the ghouls and goblins haunt you this holiday.

1. Keep the Candy Bowl Far Away

Chocolate, sugar-free candies containing xylitol, raisins, and wrappers can cause major problems for pets. Call the Pet Poison Helpline if you think your pet has ingested any goodies!

2. Watch the Candles

Curious pets and candles do not mix. Not only can candles set ablaze, if knocked over, wax can cause serious burns on your pet’s skin! If wax spills on their fur, do not attempt to cut it out. Contact Longwood Vet Center for an appointment to closely evaluate your pet’s skin and possible burn. Treatment above and beyond simple clipping may be necessary.

3. Costume Disasters

How cute are pet costumes? While they are adorable, your dog or cat is not used to wearing clothes and the act of dressing up for Halloween may quickly become a traumatic experience. If they are comfortable donning a vampire cape and wings great, but make sure the costume does not restrict movement or have pieces that are easily chewed off and are a choking hazard!

4. Who’s that Knocking?

Constant doorbell ringing may be stressful for even the most social pet. It is best to leave pets in a closed room or crate until the commotion has settled. Always remember to keep identification tags or microchips up-to-date if anxiety causes your pet to flee.

Have fun and stay safe!

Love – Your Friends at Longwood Vet

Written by: Tara Corridori, LVT

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